No home solar battery rebates on offer in Queensland as the government opts for large-scale projects

Katie R. Ochoa

Keith Gregg has not paid an electricity bill in over a year after installing a solar battery at his Helensvale home on the Gold Coast, but if you’re considering doing the same, there is no financial assistance from the Queensland government in the latest state budget.

Industry figures say soaring energy prices and the risk of blackouts has home owners rushing to retailers to order solar panels and batteries, but the steep upfront costs are a barrier to many.

Mr Gregg said after years of having solar panels, getting a battery was a no-brainer.

“After a long time of just having the solar power during the day, I simply decided it was a good idea to have solar power at night, as well,” Mr Gregg said.

“It worked very well — it did cost a fair bit of money, but certainly money well spent.”

The retiree said it would be around another two years till he broke even on costs, but it was an easily justifiable purchase.

“We had a power cut here some time ago — my place had all its lights on, I could still watch television, no problems.

“What surprised me was that I didn’t get people pouring in from the other side of the street.”

A man stands in front of a house with solar panels on the roof.
Keith Gregg’s battery allows him to self-power his home at night with solar panels. (ABC News: Alex Brewster)

State invests in large-scale batteries 

On Friday, the Queensland government announced a multi-million-dollar investment to ramp up the state’s energy independence.

Thirteen large-scale batteries will be rolled out across the state, including a 200-megawatt battery at Greenbank, at Logan south of Brisbane — the state’s largest.

The batteries are expected to operational by the end of next year.

Posted , updated 

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